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 Post Posted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 9:55 pm 
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Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:19 am
Posts: 34
G,day,
Question for the drag race only falcon or mustang owners out there if you don't mind.
How do you set the wheel alignment up or more to the point how much do you lift the front when you set the alignment?
Reason i ask is at static ride height i have 1/16" toe in , lift the front 2 " and the toe in goes to 1/2" and the camber pulls more negative camber.
My car runs 10.29 at 130mph, 3200 lbs and i know it has a fairly nose up attitude, i'd imagine whats important is the cars front ride height at the faster part of the track say 1/8" mile onward?
Thanks very much!
Cheers,
Paul


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 Post Posted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:00 pm 
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Joined: Wed Oct 24, 2007 6:36 pm
Posts: 718
Location: Blanco, Texas
Take a picture at the finish line and figure out how high the front end is, then use that as the height to set your front end alignment.

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Donee


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 Post Posted: Mon Nov 22, 2010 10:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 19, 2006 4:11 pm
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Location: Shepherdsville, KY
I don't have a Mustang/Falcon but I do have a lot of experience with front suspensions & alignment. If the toe is changing as the ride height is changed then you have a bit of bump steer. As far as the camber changing I wouldn't worry about that, it doesn't hurt anything. The toe is different story because you not only have the additional wear and drag that comes along with scrubbing the tires but you have to worry about the car changing directions when you let out of the throttle or hit a bump. 7/16" bump steer isn't that bad but you have to consider how much the total change is when you compress the suspension as when you are braking. I have fixed some cars that had 2-3 inches of bump steer in 3 inches of suspension travel and had less than 1/16" by the time I finished them. It's usually easy enough to fix by altering the location of the point where the steering arms meet the tie rods. The most common way to do this is to convert the outer tie rods to a rod end then play with the length of the spacer between the steering arm and the rod end until you get the minimum amount of toe change. When I align a drag car I put as much positive caster in it as I can get and keep it even side to side (usually 2*-5* positive on a-arm and factory type struts and 10* on chassis car strut), try to get the camber as close to zero and then set the toe and check/correct the bump steer. The other changes can affect the bump so I check it last.

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Chuck Woloch

Chuck's Automotive
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 Post Posted: Tue Nov 23, 2010 12:44 am 
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Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:19 am
Posts: 34
G,day,
Thanks very much to both of you! i will have a look for some photo's and have a look at the geometry and see if that can be corrected without too much grief.
I had a yarn to a guy here in aus today that used to hold some records in a class called "a" street over here with the same type of car and he would jack the front 2 - 3 " then set it up and would hear the tyres protesting in the braking area.
I'll look into it.
Thanks very much!
Paul


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