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 Post subject: PG pump mods
 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 7:38 pm 
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Here's what I do to the stock glide pump. It's all in the book....Drill out the converter fill holes to 1/4 inch as all the pumps I have are 1/8 except one. The other holes are for lubrication.. Ken or anyone if you have any other mods you do please post them.....I did skip putting it the pipe plug for the priming valve and like it says in the book it bit me ](*,) .....That pin brakes your pushing back to the trailerImage

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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 7:38 pm 
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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 7:39 pm 
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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 7:40 pm 
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And of course a new stator =;  =; Image

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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 8:11 pm 
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The 1/4 pipe plug for the priming valve is the most important modification you can do. As Barry said keeps you from pushing back to the trailer.

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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:40 pm 
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I've seen some of those valves with a larger roll pin in them rather than the plug.  I've done both and both worked ok.  

Another thing that's important is to make sure you use a clamp to put the pump back together, like a really really really big hose clamp around the outside of the two pieces to make sure everything is concentric cuz there's no dowel or anything like that to center it up.  Also, a little petroleum jelly in the pump gears will make it prime itself faster on first startup.

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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 9:58 pm 
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Thanks Barry, Matt and Ken as it turns out my pump already has a harden shaft and had already  been drilled except   it still  had a roll pin so we tapped it for a 1/4 pipe plug.One question... I may have messed up... I put the  pipe plug  in deep enough to block the roll pin holes  and the valve dosen't open as far (it does open)..Is this a problem??  Is Barry using the roll pin and the 1/4 plug?

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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 10:43 pm 
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Jerry, that plug has to have a hole in the middle of it!  It's not necessary to put the pin back in if you tap the hole and put the plug in it.  As I said, you just have make sure there is a hole in he center of the plug ro allow oil to get out.  Tht threads are going to be somewhat shallow too but it will work fine.

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 Post Posted: Thu Oct 18, 2007 10:45 pm 
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Ken0069 wrote:
Jerry, that plug has to have a hole in the middle of it!  It's not necessary to put the pin back in if you tap the hole and put the plug in it.  As I said, you just have make sure there is a hole in he center of the plug ro allow oil to get out.  Tht threads are going to be somewhat shallow too but it will work fine.
Yes i did drill a 3/16  hole in it  Thanks

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 Post Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 5:49 am 
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Jerry, I put the pipe plug in just to cover the pin hole as that should be where the valv should be if the pin was still there.

No on the pin and the pipe plug, I kust use the plug and a little blue locktite
=;  =;

I also drill a could holes for lubrication..

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 Post Posted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 10:07 pm 
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Another thing that's important is to make sure you use a clamp to put the pump back together, like a really really really big hose clamp around the outside of the two pieces to make sure everything is concentric cuz there's no dowel or anything like that to center it up.  

Another thing you can do is put the pump together loose and install it into an empty case upside down (no o-ring) I did not have a clamp large enough.

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 Post Posted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 8:36 pm 
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Transman wrote:
One thing to be very cautious of is to drill the feed passage along side the stator tube.  In reality it's a monkey-see monkey-do thing that is NOT a necessity.  Why?  Some time take your valve body apart. ;)  Then follow the charge feed from the pump back through the case to the valve body.  You'll see what I mean quickly when you find it.  The issue is that it can leave a thin area from the passage to the stator tube bore and allow a stress crack to form.  Not good.  IMO even a 3/16" passage is plenty large and will not be any restriction.  The key is to use the right input shaft/ring/pump combo to keep charge pressure in the converter.  Or not... at times... when you want to do some strange things. ;)
Which feed passage  hole are you talking about exactly?? BTW I called you to buy some parts but never heard back from you

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 Post Posted: Tue Oct 23, 2007 10:40 pm 
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If memory serves, the last one of those I drilled I put a 3/16 hole in it.  I think that is what the TSR manual said to do with it.

As far as the light spring goes on the servo, I don't think I'd go there.  Although the hydraulic pressure is the same on both sides of that piston at the shift, the surface area is less on the release side because of the shaft that goes thru to the inside to connect to the low band linkage.  So spring pressure has to overcome that difference in area and if the shift is slow, then it will cause more wear on the low band if the piston isn't moving away fast enough.  It's the same principle as a hydraulic cylinder with only one rod end.  It will push with more force than it will retract with at the same psig of pressure.

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 Post Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 9:38 am 
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That is actually totally opposite of what they tell us to do in the book   O:)

Can you post a pic of the other light spring and the stock spring you use Steve :-k



I don't know about you Ken but I have always used the stock spring although
I do have a heavy aftermarket one that I never used cause the stock one works and I try not to touch stuff that works  =;

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 Post Posted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 10:49 am 
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At say 250psig line pressure you have 1453 lbs of force against the low band.  The release side will have 1376 lbs when high gear is applied, which cannot fully release the low band on its own because of a 77 lb differential across the piston.  That means the spring is what has to overcome that 76 lbs plus push the fluid out of the apply side to make the low band release fully.  Any way you look at it, the lighter spring will slow down the shift process because it is what actually makes the shift complete since psig is equalized across the piston and force is not.  

You say they work for you.  That’s great.  The stockers have worked for me since 1988!  So, if it ain’t broke, then I’m not going to try to fix it unless I have issues that point to that part as a problem.  

Way back, about a year or two after I built my first Glide, TCI came out with what they called a ‘Gorilla’ servo spring that was stronger than the stocker was?  At that time, they said that was a “must have” item!  I have one of those still in the skin package that I never used, and was money wasted too BTW.  Another of those “latest and greatest” “fixes” that went by the wayside I guess, huh.

As far as back up when the Tbrake is applied goes, we both know that not enough fluid volume is what causes this most of the time.  Guys that like to “idle” in @ 800 rpm and apply the brake are the ones that seem to have most of these problems.  I idle my engine at 1200 and never have this problem and others that do the same don’t either.  

So there are three possible fixes for that.  Larger pump gears, weaker servo spring (your opinion) or more RPM, and BTW, I can change the RPM without pulling the transmission.  Yeah, it could be changed in the car on some cars but it would be a bitch to say the least.  I wouldn’t!

So the bottom line here is that you’re not going to change my mind and I’m pretty sure I’m not going to be able to change yours.  

Agree to disagree!

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